Georgia Tech Neuro Seminar Series

"Combining Transcranial Brain Stimulation with Neuroimaging State-dependent Stimulation and Causal Network Interrogation

*To participate virtually, CLICK HERE

Til Ole Bergmann, Ph.D.
Sosland Family Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience
Johannes Gutenberg University

*Lunch provided for in-person attendees


BIO

Til Ole Bergmann graduated in Psychology at the University of Kiel (Germany), and did his PhD with Prof. Hartwig Siebner on the oscillatory underpinnings of memory consolidation during sleep using concurrent tES-TMS, EEG-fMRI, and TMS-EEG. He is a biological psychologist / cognitive neuroscientist interested in the function of neuronal oscillations in cognition, in particular for the organization of information processing and the gating of synaptic plasticity in the wake and sleeping human brain. His methodological focus is on the simultaneous combination of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation techniques with neuroimaging and electrophysiology and the development of novel approaches, such as brain state-dependent brain stimulation.

RESEARCH

The TOBergmannLab (Neurostimulation Group) is located at the Neuroimaging Center (NIC) of the Johannes Gutenberg University Medical Center and associated with the Leibniz Institute for Resilience Research (LIR). The main focus of the group is on the development and application of multimodal non-invasive neurostimulation and neuroimaging approaches, combining neuronavigated transcranial brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial magnetic (TMS), electric (tES), and ultrasound (TUS) stimulation, with concurrent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as well as electro- and magnetoencephalography (EEG, MEG). They use concurrent EEG-fMRI, TMS-fMRI, TMS-EEG, tES-MEG, and tES-TMS, as well as (closed-loop) brain state dependent brain stimulation approaches, such as real-time EEG-triggered TMS, to investigate the function of neuronal oscillations in cognition, in particular their ability to organize information processing and to gate synaptic plasticity in the wake and sleeping human brain.