12 Emerging Technologies That May Help Power the Future

<p>"A Na-TECC engine could sit in your backyard and use heat from the sun to power an entire house," Shannon Yee, assistant professor in Georgia Tech's George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering.</p>

"A Na-TECC engine could sit in your backyard and use heat from the sun to power an entire house," Shannon Yee, assistant professor in Georgia Tech's George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering.

The world human population is already more than 7 billion – a number that could exceed 11 billion by 2100, according to projections from the United Nations. This rising populace, coupled with environmental challenges, puts even greater pressure on already strained energy resources.

Granted, there’s no silver bullet, but Georgia Tech researchers are developing a broad range of technologies to make power more abundant, efficient, and eco-friendly.

This feature provides a quick look at a dozen unusual projects that could go beyond traditional energy technologies to help power everything from tiny sensors to homes and businesses.

Read the complete feature on the Research Horizons website

<p>“Because the heat transfer coefficient is very high with SCCO2, you can do dry cooling in an arid environment,” said Devesh Ranjan, Associate Professor, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering.</p>

“Because the heat transfer coefficient is very high with SCCO2, you can do dry cooling in an arid environment,” said Devesh Ranjan, Associate Professor, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering.

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John Toon

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