2017 Research News

Got a sore throat? The doctor may write a quick prescription for penicillin or amoxicillin, and with the stroke of a pen, help diminish public health and your own future health by encouraging bacteria to evolve resistance to antibiotics. It’s time to develop alternatives to antibiotics for small infections, according to a new thought paper by…

Cracking the German Enigma code is considered to be one of the decisive factors that hastened Allied victory in World War II. Now researchers have used similar techniques to crack some of the brain’s mysterious code. By statistically analyzing clues intercepted through espionage, computer science pioneers in the 1940s were able to work out the…

Can companies rely on the results of one or two scientific studies to design a new industrial process or launch a new product? In at least one area of materials chemistry, the answer may be yes — but only 80 percent of the time. The replicability of results from scientific studies has become a major source of concern in the research community,…

A gecko scampering up a wall or across a ceiling has long fascinated scientists and encouraged them to investigate how to harness lizard’s mysterious ability to defy gravity. While human-made devices inspired by gecko feet have emerged in recent years, enabling their wearers to slowly scale a glass wall, the possible applications of gecko-…

New technology that could be used in self-powered smart cities of the future will soon be demonstrated at the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Visitor Complex at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Ilan Stern, a senior research scientist with the Georgia Tech Research Institute, and colleagues, are collaborating on a $2 million project supported by NASA…

By using an electrochemical etching process on a common stainless steel alloy, researchers have created a nanotextured surface that kills bacteria while not harming mammalian cells. If additional research supports early test results, the process might be used to attack microbial contamination on implantable medical devices and on food processing…

If the bristles of a brush abruptly collapsed into wads of noodles, the brush would, of course, become useless. When it’s a micron-scale brush called a “polyelectrolyte brush,” that collapse could put a promising experimental drug or lubricant out of commission. But now a new study reveals, in fine detail, things that make these special bristles…

Somewhere in our galaxy, an exoplanet is probably orbiting a star that’s colder than our sun, but instead of freezing solid, the planet might be cozy warm thanks to a greenhouse effect caused by methane in its atmosphere. NASA astrobiologists from the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a comprehensive new model that shows how…

What if you had to wait eight years to get the great new cellphone technology your friends and neighbors were using today? That’s essentially the situation facing today’s warfighters, who must wait for long procurement cycles to bring them the latest technology. The U.S. Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR), Naval Air Warfare Center - Aircraft…

Georgia Tech’s Executive Vice President for Research (EVPR), Steve Cross, has announced plans to step down from that post at the end of June 2018. Cross, who has served as EVPR since that position was created in 2010, will then resume his research faculty position in the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), where he has twice served in…